Army

BTU #298 - Making Wine on Active Duty (Brian Retherford)

BTU #298 - Making Wine on Active Duty (Brian Retherford)

Why Listen:

Brian co-founded a wine business while on Active Duty, which is one of several “side hustles” in his life. Regardless of your interest in wine, entrepreneurship, or side hustles, this is a FANTASTIC interview. We talk about how you can use an existing product while bringing marketing and branding to the table to make it a business. In Brian’s case, he is redistributing wines from incredible vineyards under his own label, which means he doesn’t have to worry about creating and maintaining a product. We talk about how preparation happens well before the opportunity arises, about giving back, about using volunteering opportunities, about cultivating side pursuits while in the military and more.

About Brian:

Brian Retherford is currently serving in the US Army, where he is the team leader for a multi-function cyberspace operations team, and has served for 15 years. He is also the Founder of Claudine Wines, which is what we're going to spend most of our time talking about today. He started out at West Point, and has served in the Army since he graduated in 2004. He has an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

BTU #306 - Vietnam WIA to 4x Super Bowl Champion (Rocky Bleier)

BTU #306 - Vietnam WIA to 4x Super Bowl Champion (Rocky Bleier)

Why Listen:

Special thanks for ESPN for helping make this interview happen. A new film about Rocky, The Return, will air on August 20th, featuring Rocky’s story, and his return to Vietnam where he sustained his injuries 50 years ago. Rocky’s story - of going from the NFL to Vietnam, to being wounded in action, being told he will never again play football, and clawing his way back to the NFL to win 4 Super Bowls is absolutely inspiring.

About Rocky:

Not falling within the ideal of what a running back should look like, Bleier had to run harder and play smarter to be able to stand out. Despite his drive and ability to make the big play, the Pittsburgh Steelers only considered him a late round pick. But before the season ended that first year, he was drafted again…this time by the United States Army. At the height of the Vietnam War, Bleier was thrust into combat early and was seriously wounded when his platoon ran into an ambush. Receiving wounds from both rifle fire and grenade fragments in his legs, he was barely able to walk and his professional football career seemed to have ended before it began…

For more than two years, he drove himself. Little by little he overcame obstacles and fought his way back. He not only made the Pittsburgh Steelers, but also eventually became a starting running back on a team that won four Super Bowls and became the greatest football team of the 20th century.

The hard lessons Rocky Bleier learned early in his life that helped him overcome adversity and reach his goals, have paid off after football. These lessons are seen between the lines in the popular book on his life, "Fighting Back" and on stages of speaking appearances around the country.

BTU #293 - Coach K

BTU #293 - Coach K

Why Listen

Seriously? This is Coach K. I know nothing about sports, and even I know about Coach K. Hailing back to my days trying to escape from the Naval Academy, my friend Scott and I would go down to Duke to hang out with a friend of mine from High School. Hearing her and her friends talk about Coach K with reverence, started my esteem for this man. Despite his insanely busy schedule, Coach K took time to speak with me and the Beyond the Uniform audience about how his military experience shaped his coaching philosophy, how he crosses the generational gap to motivate his players, how to overcome failure, how to achieve work life balance and more.

About Coach K

A graduate of West Point, Mike Krzyzewski is a living legend. In 39 seasons at Duke, Coach K is a Naismith Hall of Fame coach, a five-time national champion and 12-time Final Four participant; a 6 time Gold Medalist as head coach of US Men's National Team, and is the winningest Basketball Coach in Division 1 Men's Basketball history.

BTU #291 - Recruiting Advice & ADP (Jason Goroff)

BTU #291 - Recruiting Advice & ADP (Jason Goroff)

Why Listen

Jason has an immense amount of experience in recruiting, both in and out of the military. He gives a WEALTH of knowledge in this interviewing about networking, job fair prep, applying to jobs and more. At ADP, he leads a team of 12 who help companies institute a Veteran hiring program, as well as a Veteran training program once they start to hire Veterans. We talk about the step back that most Veterans need to make in terms of pay and seniority when they leave the military. We talk about continuously learning and building a skill set to progress one’s career. And we talk about a whole host of topics relevant to any military Veteran.

About Jason

Jason Goroff is a Military Recruitment Manager at ADP, which gives companies of every size the tools to help their people thrive. From payroll, benefits and regulatory compliance to talent management and analytics, ADP helps their clients succeed. Jason started out in the Army, where he served for 11 years. He started his civilian career in the staffing industry before moving on to the First Data Corporation and now ADP.

BTU #290 - We Study Billionaires (Preston Pysh)

BTU #290 - We Study Billionaires (Preston Pysh)

Why Listen

It was such an honor to connect with Preston, who runs the #1 Investing Podcast, We Study Billionairs, which has over 1 million downloads per month. In addition to that, he is ranked on Amazon in the top 35 Business Authors. Both of these are impressive enough on their own, but what really kicks this to the next level is the fact that Preston does all of this while serving on Active Duty in the military, as well as being a present parent of four kids. First of all - my apologies to both Preston and listeners, because I had some technical difficulties with this interview. Fortunately, Preston is always prepared, and had a backup recording of our interview, as my recording software crashed for the first time in 280 episodes during Preston’s interview. However, that recording did not have my audio, so I had to re-record this. So, bear with me if the audio quality of this episode is not as good as other episodes, but I assure you the content is absolutely top notch. Preston is humble and authentic in his advice, and I believe - regardless of your intended career path - you will benefit from listening to this episode.

About Preston

Preston is the founder of The Pylon Holding company, which conservatively grows equity through the acquisition of private or public companies. He runs the #1 Investing Podcast, The Investor’s Podcast, with over 1 Million downloads per month. He a best selling author and ranked by Amazon in the top 35 Business Authors. He started out at West Point, served in the Army for over seven years. He holds an MBA from the Johns Hopkins University and has been accepted to pursue a Master of Computer and Information Technology at the University of Pennsylvania.

BTU #288 - Army to CEO @ Mercedes Benz (Steve Cannon)

BTU #288 - Army to CEO @ Mercedes Benz (Steve Cannon)

Why Listen

Steve served as President & CEO of Mercedes Benz USA, and now oversees the parent company for the Falcons and other iconic brands. We talk about the rejection that Steve faced on his way to these incredible accomplishments, and how persistence, taking advice from wherever you can get it, and creating purpose in the workplace made all the difference. Having served in such high-level leadership positions, Steve and I talk about the differences between leadership in and out of the military, as well as a common misconception about work-life balance. And we talk about the importance of getting out of one’s comfort zone, because this is precisely the area where all growth comes from.

About Steve

Steve Cannon is the CEO of AMB Group, which is comprised of Arthur Blank's for-profit businesses, including the Atlanta Falcons, Atlanta United, Mercedes-Benz Stadium and PGA TOUR Superstore. He started out at West Point, after which he served as an Army Airborne Ranger and served as 1st Lieutenant in West Germany during the fall of the Iron Curtain. He worked as a Principal at The Richards Group, which is the largest independent branding agency in the nation, with a staff of over 700 and annual billings above $1 billion. He worked at Mercedes Benz USA, first as Vice President of Marketing, and then as President and CEO.

BTU #287 - Self Reliant Leadership #2 (Jan Rutherford)

BTU #287 - Self Reliant Leadership #2 (Jan Rutherford)

Why Listen:

This is my second interview with Jan, and if you haven’t had a chance to listen to Episode #240, be sure to check that out. In this interview we talk about crucible experiences - what they are, why they are so valuable, and steps you can take to introduce them into your everyday life. We talk about why you may want to write a book even if you don’t think you would like to write a book. We talk about self-publishing vs. publishing, costs associated with writing a book, and tactical advice on how to make it a success. We talk about entrepreneurship, life, and a whole lot more.

About Jan:

Jan Rutherford is the Founder of Self Reliant Leadership, an executive and military veteran program for leaders who are Selfless, Adventurous, and possess Heroic Aspirations. He entered the US Army at age 17 (weighing 114 pounds), and spent six years in Special Forces as a medic and “A” team executive officer, and three years as a military intelligence officer. In addition to having over 25 years of business and healthcare experience, he is the co-host of The Leadership Podcast, and the author of  “The Littlest Green Beret: On Self-Reliant Leadership” where half the proceeds go to the Special Operations Warrior and Green Beret Foundations.

BTU #285 - Transition Planning Advice (Kirk Windmueller @ LMCO)

BTU #285 - Transition Planning Advice (Kirk Windmueller @ LMCO)

Why listen

Kirk retired from the Army after 22 years of service, but still found that the transition to his civilian career snuck up on him. In this interview, Kirk is candid about a lot of the mistakes that he made in his own transition. More importantly, as an act of service he put together some of the most compressive transition documents we’ve come across. In this interview we talk about Kirk’s advice on how to approach a transition out of the military, as well as Kirk’s experience at Lockheed Martin. We talk about personal branding, advanced planning on LinkedIn, the burden of responsibility that you may not realize you have, why Veterans should consider PMP programs, and more.

About Kirk

Kirk Windmueller is a Senior Operations Analyst at Lockheed Martin. He has written a few very popular articles on LinkedIn about transitioning, timeline and more, which is actually how we came to connect. Beyond the Uniform listener Chris Pisani sent me an incredible document that Kirk put together, and I realized we had to meet. Kirk is a graduate of the Citadel and the Naval Post Graduate School, and served in the Army for over 22 years, including work as a Green Beret, and retiring as an O-5.

BTU #278 - The Rotary to Airline Group (Erik Sabiston)

BTU #278 - The Rotary to Airline Group (Erik Sabiston)

Why Listen:
In this interview, Erik talks about the challenges the airline industry is facing, with an extreme shortage of personnel anticipated in the future. He talks about the Rotary Airline Group, which exists to help members of the military - with ANY background - to enter into this industry. He talks about why Veterans may love this industry, and how he can commute to work for free… from pretty much anywhere in the world.

About Erik:
Erik Sabiston is the Founder and President of Rotary to Airline Group, whose mission is to significantly increase the footing of military and civilian helicopter aviators in the commercial airlines. He is also the Co-Producer and Military Technical Advisor of Strong Eagle Media, where he has worked on four documentaries. And he is the author of the #1 Amazon bestselling military book "Dustoff 7-3 - Saving Lives Under Fire inAfghanistan”. He served in the Army for over 14 years, as an Enlisted Navy Reserves (cook), enlisted Regular Army (Crewchief), Blackhawk Instructor and Standardization Pilot

BTU #275 - Rowing 3k miles for Veterans mental health (Bryant Knight)

BTU #275 - Rowing 3k miles for Veterans mental health (Bryant Knight)

Why Listen:
In this interview we talk about the Oil & Gas industry - the different aspects of this massive field, and why Veterans may like the mission-focused approach of this industry. We also talk about Bryant’s participation in a 3,000 mile rowing race, as the first military veteran team to row an ocean as part of the Fight Oar Die team.

About Bryant:
Bryant Knight is a Senior Account Manager Rocky Mountains for LEAM Drilling Systems. He served in the Army for nearly 24 years, starting out as a flight medic, becoming an Artillery Officer, and then serving as ODA Special Forces Commander for the 20th Special Forces Group.

BTU 266 - Army Veteran to Senior Security Administrator @ Amgen (Rene Berlingeri)

BTU 266 - Army Veteran to Senior Security          Administrator @ Amgen (Rene Berlingeri)

Why Listen
Rene work for Amgen in their Puerto Rico office, where he oversees an expansive security system. He talks about life at Amgen, about his work with military Veterans within Amgen, about continuing to serve on reserves and complete multiple deployments all while still working at Amgen, about passion and doing things with purpose in your heart and much more.

About Rene
Rene Berlingeri is a Senior Security Administrator for Amgen's Manufacturing footprint in Puerto Rico. In the Army, he served in the Army for nearly 30 years, retiring as a Command Sergeant Major. He lives with his wife and six children in Puerto Rico.

BTU #256 - From Army to 22 Years @ Amgen (Ben Chu)

BTU #256 - From Army to 22 Years @ Amgen (Ben Chu)

Why Listen:
Ben’s first job out of the Army was at Amgen, and he has worked there for nearly 23 years. In this interview we talk about the variety of roles he has held at Amgen. We also talk about Ben’s extensive experience mentoring many Veterans through American Corporate Partners. Ben shares advice for listeners based on his mentorship work and common challenges he’s seen Veterans face. He talks about the importance of understanding why you are leaving the military. He shares advice about networking and how a connection with another Veteran lead to his work in Research & Development. He talks about how to explain one’s background to someone who is not familiar with the military. He shares why it’s important to be as close as possible to selling a product or making a product. And we talk about much, much more.

About Ben:
Ben Chu is a Director, Global Program Management at Amgen, the world’s largest biotechnology company.  Amgen’s mission is to serve patients by developing innovative and transformative medicines. He started out at West Point, after which he served as a Combat Engineer in the Army for over 6 years. He has worked at Amgen for nearly 23 years, starting out in Amgen’s Engineering organization, and then, with the help of the veteran’s network, landed a PM role in R&D, where he has worked in a variety of leadership roles (Pre-Clinical, Clinical, Regulatory & Safety, and now Commercialization). Ben holds an M.S. Engineering from UCLA and an M.B.A. from Pepperdine University.

BTU #219 - Quadruple Amputee to Recalibrated Warrior, NYT Best-Selling Author, and Non-Profit President (Travis Mills)

BTU #219 - Quadruple Amputee to Recalibrated Warrior, NYT Best-Selling Author, and Non-Profit President (Travis Mills)

Why Listen:
Travis is one of only five veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to survive his quadruple amputee injuries. His life and story since then are inspiring, including becoming a NYT Best Selling author, starting the Travis Mills Foundation to help other “re-calibrated warriors”, to being the subject of an upcoming major motion picture release. He lives his motto: never give up, never quit.

About Travis:
Travis Mills is the President of the Travis Mills Group, President of the Travis Mills Foundation, and a NYT Best Selling Author of the book, Tough as They Come. On April 10, 2012, while a Staff Sergeant in the Army, Travis was on a mission during his third tour of duty in Afghanistan. He set his backpack down – and a buried IED exploded on impact. When he woke up four days later on his 25th birthday, he had lost all four limbs. Travis is one of only five veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to survive his quadruple amputee injuries. His journey since then has been one of hard work, inspiration, and helping other combat-injured vets. Last summer, SSG Mills and the Travis Mills Foundation opened a fully accessible facility for recalibrated warriors and their families. For the second year, the retreat offers – at no cost – adaptive sports, recreation, spa services, chef-prepared meals, and whatever else the families need to rest, relax, and reconnect. Travis is also an in-demand motivational speaker and the co-owner of a lodge and marina. His story is set to be the subject of a major motion picture which is expected to be directed by Sylvester Stallone, who will also co-star with Adam Driver. He is also the subject of the award-winning documentary, Travis: A Soldier’s Story.

Our Sponsor: 

  • This episode is sponsored by Lockheed Martin. At Lockheed Martin, veterans are at the center of everything they do — in fact, one in five of their employees has served in uniform. Lockheed Martin is proud to help men and women like you successfully transition into civilian careers. Join Lockheed Martin and you will find opportunities to take on the same kind of long-term challenging assignments you tackled while in the military.  Whether you’re on active duty, transitioning or already embarking on your civilian career, Lockheed Martin’s Military Connect is your online community for professional support. You can find out more at https://lockheedmartin.bravenew.com

  • StoryBox- People trust each other more than advertising. StoryBox provides the tools and supports businesses need to take the best things customers say about them, and use them to drive more sales and referrals. StoryBox offers a 10% discount to companies employing veterans of the US Armed Forces.

  • Audible is offering one FREE audio book to Beyond the Uniform listeners. You can claim this offer here, and see a list of books recommended by my guests at BeyondTheUniform.io/books

BTU #112: Growing Black Rifle Coffee from $1.8k to $20M in 2.5 years (Evan Hafer)

BTU #112: Growing Black Rifle Coffee from $1.8k to $20M in 2.5 years (Evan Hafer)

Evan Hafer is the Founder & CEO of Black Rifle Coffee, a small batch coffee roasting company. He started out at the University of Idaho, after which he spent 14 years in the U.S. Army as an infantryman, a Special Forces soldier, and a CIA contractor.I came across Evan in a 2016 Forbes Article about the Top 25 Veteran Founded Startups in America.

BTU #88 - Mike Benedosso - Army Boxing National Champion to LinkedIn & Google

BTU #88 - Mike Benedosso - Army Boxing National Champion to LinkedIn & Google

Mike works in New Business Development at Google as part of Google Cloud. He started out at West Point, where he was the Boxing Team Captain and a National Champion. He served in the Army for five years: first as an Executive Officer (XO) of a Military Intelligence Company and then as a Platoon Leader and Team Captain of the Army Boxing Team in the Army's World Class Athlete Program at Fort Carson, Colorado. There, he trained to earn a spot on the 2012 US Olympic Boxing team. Since leaving the Army in 2012, he has worked at Sony, LinkedIn, Google, and earned his MBA from UCLA.

BTU #79 - Camilla Maybee: Army Officer to Medical School at George Washington University

BTU #79 - Camilla Maybee: Army Officer to Medical School at George Washington University

Camilla Maybee is currently in her second year of Medical School at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. She started out at West Point, after which she served as a Medical Supply Officer as well as an Ambulance Platoon Leader and role II XO in the Army for four years. After separation from the Army, she worked at the UVA Health System as Administrative Assistant. She holds a Masters of Science in Health Care Administration from the University of Maryland.

BTU #74 - Nate Boyer: Army Green Beret to the NFL

BTU #74 - Nate Boyer: Army Green Beret to the NFL

Most recently, Nate Boyer was the long snapper for the Seattle Seahawks, but his is also an actor, public speaker and thought leader. Nate started out as a relief worker in Sudan, building camps for refugees of the War in Darfur. He then joined the Army, where he served for six years with the Green Beret as a Sergeant and earning a Bronze Star. After he transitioned from the Army, although he had never played a down of organized football in his life, he went to the University of Texas and was a walk-on to their football team. He became the team's starting long snapper, and played 38 consecutive games for the Longhorns. He was an Academic All-American in 2013-14, Academic All Big 12 from 2011-2014. After Texas, Nate played with the Seattle Seahawks as a free agent.

BTU #65 - Mark Frank: Army to Serial Entrepreneur and Founder of Four Companies

BTU #65 - Mark Frank: Army to Serial Entrepreneur and Founder of Four Companies

Mark Frank is the CEO and Co-Founder of Sondermind, a startup that is focused on making mental health services more accessible and accepted for everyone. He started out West Point and served as an Logistics Officer in the Army for five years. After the Army, Mark earned both his MBA and Masters of Engineering Management at Northwestern University. After grad school, he an Associate Investment Banker at Morgan Stanley for two years before serving as Founder & CEO at Next Oncology. After six years at Next Oncology, he sold the company in a deal that brought a 12X return to investors. In addition to founding Sondermind and Next Oncology, Mark has also started SafeImageMD and TermScout, as well as served as the Managing Director of the investment company, Goldwing Capital.

Army vs. Air Force vs. Navy: How Branch of Military Services Affects One's Career

  Overview: This article looks at the Industries, Functional Roles, and Company Sizes pursued by veterans of the Army, Air Force, and Navy. It also compares these three branches of the military to each other to see how their career choices differ. My intention for this article is to highlight the wide array of civilian career possibilities for military veterans, and provide a starting point for further career research. additional background information on my motivation for this analysis can be found here.

Methodology: A full summary of the basis for this article can be found here. The most important thing to note is that this is based on LinkedIn data for Service Academy veterans only. I have used Service Academy veterans as a proxy for all Army / Air Force / Navy officers, as it was the most reliable way to sort through the LinkedIn data available. While there are obvious limitations to this approach, my intention is for this to be a starting point for further research.

You can view the complete interactive data visualizations here.

U.S. Army [data visualization here]:

Industries [data visualization here]:

The top twelve industry categories for Army officers is as follows:

  1. Government & Law (18%): Although the top industry for Army officers, they are the least likely of the Armed Services to end up here, a full 25% less likely than Air Force, and 7% less likely than Navy officers.
  2. Technology (17%)
  3. Business (11%): most likely of all officers to enter into Business. They are 41% more likely than Air Force and 13% more likely than Navy officers.
  4. Financial Services (11%): most likely of all officers to enter into Financial Services. They are 73% more likely than Air Force and 19% more likely than Navy officers.
  5. Health Services (7%): most likely of all officers to enter into Health Services. They are 39% more likely than Navy and 15% more likely than Air Force officers.
  6. Real Estate & Construction (7%): most likely of all officers to end up here, as they are 26% more likely than Air Force and 21% more likely than Navy officers.
  7. Other (6%)
  8. Education & Research (6%): most likely of all officers to end up here, with Army officers 26% more likely than Air Force and 21% more likely than Navy officers.
  9. Arts (4%): least likely of all officers to end up here, as they are 3% less likely than both Air Force and Navy officers.
  10. Consumer Packaged Goods (4%): most likely member of the Armed Services to end up in CPG. They are 66% more likely than Air Force and 27% more likely than Navy officers to end up here.
  11. Manufacturing (4%): most likely member of the Armed Services to end up in Manufacturing. They are 57% more likely than Air Force and 23% more likely than Navy to end up here.
  12. Transportation (4%): least likely of all officers to enter Transportation. They are 77% less likely than Air Force and 56% less likely than Navy officers.

Functional Roles [data visualization here]:

The top 10 Functional Roles for Army officers is as follows:

  1. Operations (21%): Although this is the most common Functional Role for Army officers, compared to other branches of the military, Army is the least likely to pursue a functional role in Operations. They are 31% less likely than Air Force and 7% less likely than Navy officers.
  2. Sales (12%): most likely of all branches of the military to pursue a role in Sales; 63% more likely than Air Force and 21% more likely than Navy officers.
  3. Entrepreneurship (11%): most likely of all branches of the military to pursue a role in Entrepreneurship; 15% more likely than Air Force and 5% more likely than Navy officers.
  4. Program & Project Management (10%): most likely of all branches of the military to pursue a role here; 26% more likely than Air Force and 2% more likely than Navy officers.
  5. Engineering (10%): least likely of all members of the Armed Forces to pursue a role in Engineering; 15% less likely than Navy and 2% less likely than Air Force officers.
  6. Finance (8%): most likely of all members of the Armed Forces to pursue a role in Finance; 61% more likely than Air Force and 13% than Navy officers.
  7. Consulting (8%): most likely of all members of the Armed Forces to pursue a role in Consulting; 41% more likely than Air Force and 10% more likely than Navy officers.
  8. Education (7%): least likely of all members of the Armed Forces to pursue a role in Education; 17% less likely than Air Force and 1% less likely than Navy officers.
  9. Information Technology (7%): least likely of all military officers to pursue a role in IT; 9% less likely than Air Force and 7% less likely than Navy officers.
  10. Military & Protective Services (6%): least likely of all military officers to pursue a role here; 22% less likely than Air Force and 5% less likely than Navy officers.

Company Size [data visualization here]:

Army officers are most likely to join a company that has:

  1. 10,000+ Employees (37%): Although Army officers are most likely to end up in a massive organization, they are the least likely of all officers to end up here; 22% less likely than Air Force and 2% less likely than Navy officers.
  2. 1,001 to 5,000 Employees (14%)
  3. 51 to 200 Employees (10%)
  4. 11 to 50 Employees (10%)
  5. 201 to 500 Employees (8%): most likely of all military officers to end up at a company of this size; 15% more likely than Air Force and 5% more likely than Navy officers.
  6. 1 to 10 Employees (8%): most likely of all military officers to end up at a company of this size; 19% more likely than Air Force and 8% more likely than Navy officers.
  7. 5,001 to 10,000 Employees (7%): most likely of all military officers to end up at a company of this size; 24% more likely than Air Force and 5% more likely than Navy officers.
  8. 501 to 1,000 Employees (6%): most likely of all military officers to end up at a company of this size; 32% more likely than Air Force and 16% more likely than Navy officers.
  9. Self-Employed (1%)

U.S. Air Force [data visualizations here]:

Industries [data visualization here]:

The top twelve industry categories for Air Force officers is as follows:

  1. Government & Law (25%): most likely of all officers to pursue a career in Government & Law. This is driven mostly by the subcategory of Defense & Space, where Air Force veterans are 118% more likely than Army and 64% more likely than Navy officers to pursue a career. Overall when it comes to Government & Law, Air Force officers are 33% more likely than Army and 25% more likely than Navy officers to pursue a career here.
  2. Transportation (16%): most likely of all officers to pursue a career in Transportation. This is driven mostly by two subcategories dominated by the Air Force: (1) Aviation & Aerospace, where Air Force officers are 244% more likely than Army and 72% more likely than Navy officers to pursue a career; and (2) Airlines/Aviation where Air Force officers are 1,082% more likely than Army and 152% more likely than Navy officers to pursue a career. Overall, when it comes to the Transportation industry, Air Force officers are 341% more likely than Army and 92% more likely than Navy officers to pursue a career here.
  3. Technology (15%): although this is the third highest rated Industry for Air Force officers, they are the least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 12% less likely than Navy and 11% less likely than Army officers.
  4. Business (8%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 29% less likely than Army and 20% less likely than Navy officers.
  5. Health Service (6%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 21% less likely than Navy and 13% less likely than Army officers.
  6. Financial Services (6%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 42% less likely than Army and 31% less likely than Navy officers.
  7. Real Estate & Construction (6%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 21% less likely than Army and 4% less likely than Navy officers.
  8. Education & Research (5%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 21% less likely than Navy and 18% less likely than Army officers.
  9. Arts (4%)
  10. Other (4%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 50% less likely than Navy and 37% less likely than Army officers.
  11. Manufacturing (3%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 36% less likely than Army and 22% less likely than Navy officers.
  12. Consumer Packaged Goods (2%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 40% less likely than Army and 24% less likely than Navy officers.

Functional Roles [data visualization here]:

The top 10 Functional Roles for Army officers is as follows:

  1. Operations (30%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 44% more likely than Army and 33% more likely than Navy officers.
  2. Engineering (10%)
  3. Entrepreneurship (9%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 13% less likely than Army and 9% less likely than Navy officers.
  4. Education (9%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 20% more likely than Army and 19% more likely than Navy officers.
  5. Program & Project Management (8%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 21% less likely than Army and 19% less likely than Navy officers.
  6. Military & Projective Services (8%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 28% more likely than Army and 22% more likely than Navy officers.
  7. Information Technology (8%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 10% more likely than Army and 2% more likely than Navy officers.
  8. Sales (7%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 39% less likely than Army and 25% less likely than Navy officers.
  9. Consulting (6%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 29% less likely than Army and 22% less likely than Navy officers.
  10. Finance (5%): least likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 38% less likely than Army and 30% less likely than Navy officers.

Company Size [data visualization here]:

Air Force officers are most likely to join a company that has:

  1. 10,000+ Employees (47%): most likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 28% more likely than Army and 22% more likely than Navy officers.
  2. 1,001 to 5,000 Employees (12%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 20% less likely than Navy and 17% less likely than Army officers.
  3. 51 to 200 Employees (9%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 17% less likely than Navy and 14% less likely than Army officers.
  4. 11 to 50 Employees (8%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 16% less likely than Navy and 15% less likely than Army officers.
  5. 201 to 500 Employees (7%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 13% less likely than Army and 9% less likely than Navy officers.
  6. 1 to 10 Employees (6%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 16% less likely than Army and 10% less likely than Navy officers.
  7. 5,001 to 10,000 Employees (5%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 19% less likely than Army and 15% less likely than Navy officers.
  8. 501 to 1,000 Employees (5%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 24% less likely than Army and 13% less likely than Navy officers.
  9. Self-Employed (1%): least likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 14% less likely than Navy and 0.03% less likely than Army officers.

U.S. Navy [data visualization here]:

Industries [data visualization here]:

The top twelve industry categories for Navy officers is as follows:

  1. Government & Law (20%)
  2. Technology (17%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 29% more likely than Army and 20% more likely than Navy officers.
  3. Business (10%)
  4. Financial Services (9%)
  5. Transportation (8%)
  6. Other (8%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 99% more likely than Air Force and 25% more likely than Army officers.
  7. Education & Research (6%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 26% more likely than Air Force and 3% more likely than Army officers.
  8. Real Estate & Construction (6%)
  9. Health Services (5%)
  10. Manufacturing (3%)
  11. Consumer Packaged Goods (3%)
  12. Arts (4%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Industry; 3% more likely than Air Force and 0.1% more likely than Army officers.

Functional Roles [data visualization here]:

The top 10 Functional Roles for Navy officers is as follows:

  1. Operations (23%)
  2. Engineering (11%): most likely of all officers to pursue this Functional Role; 18% more likely than Army and 15% more likely than Air Force officers.
  3. Program & Project Management (10%)
  4. Entrepreneurship (10%)
  5. Sales (10%)
  6. Information Technology (8%)
  7. Education (7%)
  8. Finance (7%)
  9. Consulting (7%)
  10. Military & Protective Services (7%)

Company Size [data visualization here]:

Navy officers are most likely to join a company that has:

  1. 10,000+ Employees (38%)
  2. 1,001 to 5,000 Employees (14%): most likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 25% more likely than Air Force and 3% more likely than Army officers.
  3. 51 to 200 Employees (10%): most likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 20% more likely than Air Force and 3% more likely than Army officers.
  4. 11 to 50 Employees (10%): most likely of all officers to join a company of this size; 19% more likely than Air Force and 2% more likely than Army officers.
  5. 201 to 500 Employees (8%)
  6. 1 to 10 Employees (7%)
  7. 5,001 to 10,000 Employees (6%)
  8. 501 to 1,000 Employees (5%)
  9. Self-Employed (1%): most likely of all officers to be self-employed; 16% more likely than both Army and Air Force officers.

Methodology for "Army vs. Air Force vs. Navy: How Branch of Military Services Affects One's Career"

The "Army vs. Air Force vs. Navy" data visualization base all analysis on graduates from service academies. The reason for this is that LinkedIn, through their "school" search criteria makes it possible to gather data for service academy graduates, but there is no other direct way to gather data for all military officers. I want to continue this research for the enlisted community, but felt that the data would be different enough that it was important to separate the data first. The final result of this initial data can be viewed here.

I grouped the data around several key areas related to a post-military career.

  1. Industry: I looked at all 147 LinkedIn classified Industries, except for "Military." This was the easiest way to look at Army, Navy and Air Froce Officers on LinkedIn who are no longer on Active Duty. The 147 categories did not provide as much insight, so I created my own subset of categories in order to extract higher-level takeaways. I was unable to find any official guidance on the best way to create these subgroups, but provide an overview of my grouping here.
  2. Function: Fortunately, LinkedIn only provides 12 different categories for Functional Roles. However, LinkedIn only shows the top 10 industries, so this is what I have shown in the data visualization.
  3. Size of Company: This was the simplest to obtain, as LinkedIn only provides 9 categories for Company Size, and provides this data consistently for all service branches. As a result, the data here will be the most accurate to actual LinkedIn data.

In order to display the data, I used the New York Time's D3 model. Special thanks to Nemil Dalal, who put together the majority of this data, and helped me as I put together the small remainder he did not complete. I also used Upwork in a few locations to help me edit this models and add them to my Wordpress website template.

All feedback and suggestions are welcome here.